Jump to content

Geplante Lizenzänderungen an der OGL von Wizards of the Coast - Auswirkungen auf die Rollenspiel-Szene


Recommended Posts

Hey Zusammen,

Verfolgt sonst jemand hier der One DnD OGL 1.1 Skandale ich meine Nachrichten? Verfolgt @Pegasus Spiele die Nachrichten

 

Ich stimme viele den Online Community zu, vor allem der Gedanke dass DnD der größte internationale TTRPG ist wegen der OGL. Wenn WotC sich damit ins Bein schießt und alle verscheucht, wäre das die Gelegenheit für andere Systeme den Markt an Indie Creators zu sich zu holen. 

Edited by Abd al Rahman
  • Confused 1
Link to comment

Guten Morgen. Ich hatte gerade eine interessante Mail zur neuen OGL 1.1 von WOTC in meinem Postfach. Absender ist Arbiter of Worlds, die einiges auf der Grundlage der 1.0a veröffentlicht haben. Sie wirft ein Licht auf die gesamt OGL/OSR-Scene und was es für sie bedeutet, denn der Head von Arbiter of Worlds ist Anwalt und lässt an der neuen Lizenz kein gutes Haar. Ich poste sie mal als Zitat:

Zitat

The Perfidious Treachery of WOTC

Does OGL 1.1 Mean the End of Open Gaming?

Jan 10

For the last 12 years, my company Autarch has published my game Adventurer Conqueror King System under the terms of the Open Game License (OGL) 1.0. For the last 5 years, ACKS has been my full-time job.

Now, Wizards of the Coast, in what I can only describe as an act of perfidious treachery, has decided to retroactively deauthorize the OGL 1.0 and offer up a new Open Game License 1.1 to replace it.

What does this new license mean? Where do we go from here? Before we go further, please note that while I am a trained attorney (Harvard Law magna cum laude, in fact), I’m not a practicing intellectual property specialist. My thoughts should not be construed as legal advice about what you should do. These are just my thoughts about the situation Autarch has now found itself in, and what we need to do.

Can They Really Do That?!

When people learn that WOTC is deauthorizing the OGL, the first question they ask is “can they really do that?” It’s a fair question. After all, for more than 20 years we’ve all relied on the OGL to be irrevocable.

But the question isn’t whether they can do. They are doing it. Right now, on our watch. No, the question is “who is going to stop them from doing it?”

And the answer might be “no one.”

If you’re under the illusion that we live in a country with a court system that rewards the righteous, allow me to disabuse you of that notion. The American justice system is pay-to-play, and the amount you have to pay is unfathomable to those who haven’t gone through it. I consulted with one of New York’s top IP litigators last week to find out how much money I’d have to raise via GoFundMe to fight Wizards. When I asked him if $100,000 would be enough, he laughed. He said I’d need $500,000 to even have a chance of summary judgment, and $4 million for a trial. Wizards has a war chest measured in millions and will fight this out for 4-6 years.

Imagine if WOTC sued Autarch claiming that my game Ascendant was violating their copyright. Ascendant is a d100 superhero game that has nothing in common with D&D and uses no language from the SRD. WOTC would have legitimate claim whatsoever. If we had $4,000,000 to fight, we’d certainly win. But… we don’t have the money. So, we’d lose.

In real life courtroom dramas, the good guys don’t win. The rich guys win.

But Our Rich Guys Will Fight… Won’t They?

We do have a few “rich guys” that are affected by this situation, foremost among them the mighty Paizo. The OGL 1.1 is certainly an existential threat to Paizo’s business. But does that mean Paizo will litigate?

We can certainly hope so. They would be the greatest champions of the Open Gaming movement if they did. Lisa Stevens is a person of great integrity who has dealt with treachery from WOTC before. Erik Mona has a warriors ethos that has stood him in good stead in the struggle against WOTC. Few people can claim to have beaten WOTC at their own game!

Even so, we cannot be certain that Paizo will fight. In most cases, major companies work very hard to avoid law suits with their well-funded competitors; and even when there are lawsuits, they usually get settled privately in ways that don’t help or affect anyone else.

Imagine this hypothetical: Paizo files a lawsuit against Wizards. A year later, after about $500,000 of expense on motions, they begin to proceed to trial. Their lawyers estimate they have a 70% chance to win. At this point, WOTC now offers to settle, offering Paizo a perpetual irrevocable license for the 3.5E SRD in exchange for Paizo’s agreement not to exploit the 5.1 SRD in any way and other minor concessions. If you’re Paizo, do you spend another $3.5 million and 3 years in trial for a 70% win — or do you take that deal?

Most companies take that deal.

For similar reasons, we can ask whether Disney is really going to litigate with Hasbro over the KOTOR videogame from years ago. I, for one, doubt it. Any differences of opinion between Disney and Hasbro will probably just get worked out by some whiteshoe lawyers in private deals.

So we cannot rely on the hope that some rich litigator, some hero, is coming to save open gaming. We have to assume no one is coming to save us. Perhaps, given sufficient numbers, we could assemble a class action — but how many companies would still be alive after 2, 3, 4 years of being unable to safely invest in new product? Because according to Wizard, if you litigate with them, you immediately lose your license.

But WOTC Can’t Sue Everybody!

Many people believe that small independent studio won’t be affected because they can avoid being noticed. “WOTC can’t sue everybody,” they assert.

Allow me to disabuse you of this notion, too.

WOTC doesn’t have to sue everybody. All they need to do is to persuade the gatekeepers — Kickstarter, IndieGoGo, DriveThruRPG, Amazon, and a handful of other companies — that they are better off cooperating with WOTC than opposing it. Then the gatekeepers will deplatform us when WOTC tells them to.

Think of how easy it is to get de-platformed on YouTube if we use a string of music that’s a little too long, and it gets flagged by Warner Music. Think of how little recourse we have if Nintendo decides our Twitch stream violates their IP. The world we live in is one of centralized corporate control. They don’t have to litigate against us. They can simply wall us off, and leave it to us to sue them — which we cannot afford to do.

WOTC are Idiots If They Think This Will Work!

Another common refrain I’m hearing in the tabletop RPG community is “WOTC are idiots if they think this will work!” Do not make the error of underestimating your enemy. The Vice President and Chief of Staff to Hasbro is a man named Nicholas Mitchell. He spent 11 years as head of legal for Wizards of the Coast. Before that he was a law professor for 11 years specializing in intellectual property licensing. And before that he was an attorney for 3 years at Hughes Media Law Group. That’s 25 years of experience in intellectual property law. In short, Mr. Mitchell is as far from “idiot” as it comes. Whatever fancy legal claims may arise on Reddit (promissory estoppel, etc.), we can be certain he’s already thought about how he’ll handle it.

The New License Can’t Be That Bad, Though?

Since word first began to trickle out that the OGL was being changed, pro-WOTC pundits on the web have urged us to stay calm and not rush to judgment. “The new license won’t be that bad, they just want to take back control of their IP from people abusing the OGL.” Well, now the complete text of the OGL 1.1 has leaked. No, it’s not as bad as we thought — it’s much worse.

Let’s look at a few of the most awful terms found in this utterly egregious agreement:

A. Modification: This agreement is… an update to the previously available OGL 1.0(a), which is no longer an authorized license agreement. We can modify or terminate this agreement for any reason whatsoever, provided We give thirty days’ notice. We will provide notice of any such changes by posting the revisions on Our website and by making public announcements of the changes through Our social media channels.

In this paragraph, WOTC is explicitly deauthorizing the OGL 1.0. Worse, they’re asserting the right to modify or terminate OGL 1.1 in the future without cause with just 30 days notice. Can we build a business on a license that can be withdrawn with a month’s notice? No, we cannot.

What if I don’t like these terms and don’t agree to the OGL: Commercial?

That’s fine – it just means that you cannot earn income from any SRD-based D&D content you create on or after January 13, 2023, and you will need to either operate under the new OGL: NonCommercial or strike a custom direct deal with Wizards of the Coast for your project. But if you want to publish SRD-based content on or after January 13, 2023 and commercialize it, your only option is to agree to the OGL: Commercial.

This clause is intended to be reassuring, but it’s anything but. Read the first sentence: "you cannot earn income from any SRD-based D&D content you create on or after January 13, 2023.” Now read the last sentence: “If you want to publish SRD-based content on or after January 13, 2023, your only option is to agree.”

Creating content and publishing content are not the same thing. The way this statement is phrased, WOTC has left it very unclear whether game studios can continue to publish works made under OGL 1.0. The first sentence suggests “yes, you can,” but the last sentence says “no, you can’t.” Until WOTC clarifies its intent, we can’t know for sure. Given how egregious the rest of the terms are, though, I’m not inclined to give them the benefit of the doubt. WOTC could be taking the position that no one is able to publish even existing OGL 1.0 material after the 13th.

Licensed Work includes Licensed Content (what used to be called “Open Game Content”). If the only way a reader can distinguish what You created from what We did is to check Your Licensed Work against the SRD, You are not in compliance with this provision.

In this provision WOTC is demanding that we index and identify every piece of Licensed Content that you use. Given that much of the Licensed Content is entirely embedded in the very vocabulary of RPGs, this is essentially impossible to comply with. I think its designed to be impossible. And that’s unfortunate because it means they can probably terminate us without 30 days notice…

i. We may terminate the agreement immediately if:

a. You infringe upon or misuse any of Our intellectual property, violate any law in relation to Your activities under this agreement, or if We determine in Our sole discretion that You have violated Section VIII.G or VIII.H. To be clear, We have the sole right to decide what conduct violates Section VIII.G or Section VIII.H and You covenant and agree that You will not contest any such determination via any suit or other legal action. To the extent necessary and allowed by law, You waive any duty of good faith and fair dealing We would otherwise have in making any such determination.

b. You breach any other term or condition in this agreement, and that breach is not cured within 30 days of Our providing You notice of the breach by communicating with You as provided in Section VIII.A.

c. You bring an action challenging Our ownership of the Licensed Content, Unlicensed Content, or any patent or trademark owned by Wizards of the Coast.

We know this may come off strong, but this is important: If You attempt to use the OGL as a basis to release blatantly racist, sexist, homophobic, trans-phobic, bigoted or otherwise discriminatory content, or do anything We think triggers these provisions, Your content is no longer licensed.

Here WOTC is asserting the right to retroactively decide that any piece of content we’ve ever made can be dubbed problematic and therefore in violation of the license. They also retain the exclusive right to make this determination, and demand we waive our right to contest their decisions legally. And if we do file a lawsuit, they make that a breach of the license. This is utterly destructive for the Open Gaming movement: No one can safely invest in developing content if under the risk of total obliteration at any time.

Not Usable D&D Content (“Unlicensed Content”) – This is Dungeons & Dragons content that has been or later will be produced as “official” – that is, released by Wizards of the Coast or any of its predecessors or successors – and is not present in the SRD v. 5.1.

Here Wizards is asserting that the existing 3.0E, 3.5E, and 5.0 SRDs are no longer open game content! How this interacts with the deauthorization of OGL 1.0 isn’t clear, but it certainly suggests that they are planning a hardline stance. They also specifically call out “content that has been…produced by… its predecessors”, e.g. the old stuff by TSR, as being unlicensed content. This is a salvo fired at Pathfinder and the entire OSR movement.

To be clear, OGL: Commercial only allows for creation of roleplaying games and supplements in printed media and static electronic file formats. It does not allow for anything else, including but not limited to things like videos, virtual tabletops or VTT campaigns, computer games, novels, apps, graphics novels, music, songs, dances, and pantomimes.

At the time this was written, a game studio had just finished developed a computer game version of Autarch’s Domains at War, our OGL mass combat system. This provision puts that entire project in jeopardy, and the projects of virtually ever VTT, YouTube, and Patreon creator around. Again, an unconscionable change of the rules of doing business.

VIII. FUNDRAISING. We don’t object to You crowdfunding for Your Licensed Works, but We need to address concerns about overreaching and prevent the funding of infringing products. Because of that, this section has very specific requirements. If You are planning on crowdfunding, You must read this whole section carefully, and be sure You are fully compliant with it.

A. You may crowdfund, provided:

i. You may only crowdfund the production of Licensed Works.

ii. No infringing materials are given out as perks or rewards.

B. The primary product for Your campaign must be a Licensed Work, such as a campaign setting. You may have stretch goals that are not Licensed Works, provided they do not infringe upon Our intellectual property.

C. Your entire campaign, including stretch goals, is considered one product for the purposes of the royalty threshold.

Read that again. WOTC is asserting that if you sign OGL 1.1, you may only crowdfund Licensed Works. This clause does not say “If your crowdfunding campaign includes Licensed Works, the following applies.” The terms here are unlimited in their scope. Imagine we signed this agreement, and then later wanted to run a crowdfunding campaign for, say, a card game, a movie, a better jukebox. Sorry, we’re no longer allowed to: You may only crowdfund the production of Licensed Works. Yes, that’s absurd and unreasonable — but this entire agreement is absurd and unreasonable, and if I didn’t know it was real, I’d assume it was a satire.

Worse, if we do crowdfund, the whole campaign counts as one product for royalty purposes. Did we want to do a crowdfunding campaign for our OGL 1.1. sourcebook with custom miniatures? We’ll pay royalties on the miniatures, not just the book.

And now the finale…

B. You own the new and original content You create. You agree to give Us a nonexclusive, perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, sub-licensable, royalty-free license to use that content for any purpose,

A. Nothing prohibits Us from developing, distributing, selling, or promoting something that is substantially similar to a Licensed Work.

This is the money shot. I’ve presented these in reverse order because it makes it more clear exactly the situation this license puts us in. If Autarch were to sign OGL 1.1, we would be giving WOTC a perpetual irrevocable royalty-free license to all of our new and original content. There is no provision to exclude what used to be call “product identity.” Wizards has proclaimed that ITS license to us is revocable at any time, but if we use its license, then we give it an irrevocable license. This is beyond unconscionable — it’s grotesque.

And, of course, having secured the rights to all of our work if we sign, WOTC explicitly claims the right to make substantially similar products. Did we have an innovative monster? A fresh new setting concept? It’s WOTC’s now and they can do what they want with out, without attribution, without royalties.

To summarize it all: Under the old Open Game License, the licensor made its content open to the licensee. But under the new Open Game License, the licensee makes its content open to the licensor!

What Is to Be Done?

So here we are. It feels surreal. I’ve been writing OGL material for 12 years and now it’s all in jeopardy. What is to be done?

The OGL 1.1 is a non-starter. From its unconscionable claim on licensee IP to its grotesque provisions for termination, it is entirely unacceptable to us. Autarch will not agree to its terms. If that’s the hill we die on, so be it.

The OGL 1.0 is unreliable. What does being deauthorized actually do? No one knows, and only a court can say for sure. What does WOTC mean when it says that after January 13, 2023 we can’t “publish” work under the original OGL — does it mean publish new work, or publish legacy work? No one knows except Nick Mitchell, and he isn’t talking. An unreliable license is no basis to build a business on.

Therefore, the only choice is to abandon the OGL entirely. Going forward, Autarch will no longer produce material under the Open Game License. We will be launching our upcoming Adventurer Conqueror King System: Imperial Imprint (ACKS II) in May without any WOTC SRD material. We will put in place a new license - a truly open license — that will make the core rules of ACKS II available to every other OSR developer in the space. And all of our future products, on DriveThruRPG, Kickstarter, Patreon, and elsewhere, will be released to be compatible with ACKS II or Ascendant, not with anything owned or touched by WOTC.

Whether we will be able to continue to publish our existing OGL games remains to be seen. Our intent is to continue to do so until forced to stop. Whether we will be de-platformed also remains to be seen. If so, we will find or build new platforms. I’ve done it before.

To my comrades in the OSR community — I know that your situation is similar to mine, perhaps even more difficult if your game of choice is closer to TSR/WOTC’s designs. What will happen to OSE — can a perfect replica of BX be sustained without the OGL? What will happen to DCC? What will happen to LL, to LOTFP? Every developer in the OSR is endangered. I welcome any and all collaborators who would like to build on ACKS II and support any independent efforts you are making to help reclaim a space for open OSR gaming. Reach out, friend.

To my comrades in the 5E community — You deserved so much better from WOTC than you have been given. I was gratified to learn that a number of independent developers are already working on a 5E-compatible but WOTC-free SRD that will be available under the creative commons. These fine people have the right idea and I hope they will gain your support. My own work is not and has never been 5E compatible, but these efforts have my full support all the same.

With the deauthorization of OGL 1.0a and the release of OGL 1.1, Wizards of the Coast has attempted to bring an end to the open gaming movement which has made our hobby more popular than ever. But if our movement sticks together, this does not need to be the end of open gaming. This can be a new beginning.

Thanks for reading Arbiter of Worlds. This free blog posts about ACKS, Ascendant, Middle Earth, and Tabletop RPGs in general. Sign up to receive weekly email into your spam filter.

 

Link to comment
vor 7 Minuten schrieb Fimolas:

Hallo Mugga!

Kannst Du mir als Laien erklären, worum es hier geht? Ich werde aus den Buchstaben-Kürzeln nicht schlau.

Liebe Grüße, Fimolas!

Und TTRPG heißt table top rpg, also das, was wir als pen&paper rpg kennen. Vermutlich war der Begriff zu Zeiten, wo immer mehr Menschen auch ihre „normalen“ SpFen im Computer verwalten und nicht mehr ausdrucken, zu antiquiert. (Keine Angst, ich habe es gegugelt)

Gibt es für virtuelle Charakterbögen eigentlich eine Kaffeeflecken-App?

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
vor 6 Minuten schrieb Fimolas:

Ich danke Euch für die Erklärungen. Und um welche skandalösen Nachrichten geht es?

Eine erteilte, nicht wiederrufbare Lizenz, auf deren Grundlage Dutzende Verlage und tausende Fans arbeiten wird widerrufen und ersetzt. In der Neuen z.B. : startest du einen Kickstarter (KS) (ein Crowdfunding) unter der Lizenz darfst nur noch KS unter dieser Lizenz starten, nie wieder was anderes. Und alles was du unter der Lizenz machst gehört sofort, unwiederruflich WOTC.

Edited by Octavius Valesius
  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment

Es geht letztlich darum, dass Wizards of the Coast (WotC) eine Open Game License erstellt hat, um es anderen Autoren zu erleichtern Content für Dungeons & Dragons zu erstellen, vor allem in Bereichen, in denen WotC selbst nichts machen möchte. Es erlaubt den Autoren auch, das D&D-Regelwerk zu modifizieren und diese Modifikationen in ihren Werken zu veröffentlichen und sogar Geld damit zu verdienen ohne dafür Abgaben bzw. Lizenzgebühren zu zahlen. Dadurch ist ein riesiger Pool an Material zu Dungeons & Dragons entstanden.

Nun hat WotC diese OGL verändert und will doch Lizenzgebühren haben, vor allem von denen, die mit ihrem D&D-Content gut verdienen. Der Hintergrund ist wohl, dass WotC Geldprobleme hat und sich neue Geldquellen erschließen will. Es gibt nämlich einige Contentersteller, die sehr erfolgreich sind, wie z.B. Critical Role, die mit ihren Live-Events bei Twitch und bei der Zweitverwertung auf Youtube sehr viel Geld generieren. Von dem Kuchen will Wizard etwas abhaben.

  • Thanks 4
  • Sad 1
Link to comment

Nebenbei enthält die neue Variante der OGL auch eine Klausel, dass man Wizard of the Coast nicht verklagen darf, wenn man ihr zustimmt.

Und nur um die Größenordnung besser zu verstehen, Wizard of the Coast gehört inzwischen Hasbro, einem der drei größten Spielwarenhersteller der Welt.

Edit:

Gerüchteweise geht es WotC eigentlich vor allem um "Nebenrechte" (Videospiele, Filme etc.), die mit der bisherigen Variante der OGL nicht richtig abgedeckt sind. Aber sie haben halt bei der Gelegenheit gleich mehrere dicke Hämmer in die neue Version der OGL reingeschrieben. Nett war übrigens auch, dass sie die ersten Emails an Vertragspartner Mitte Dezember verschickt haben, mit einer Zweiwochenfrist bis die Antwort kommen sollte, d.h. über Weihnachten, was es noch schwerer gemacht hat, rechtzeitig eine vernünftige rechtssichere Antwort zu formulieren.

Edited by Kurna
  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
vor 1 Stunde schrieb Mugga:

Hey Zusammen,

Verfolgt sonst jemand hier der One DnD OGL 1.1 Skandale ich meine Nachrichten?

Ja, wenn auch nicht hier,... das ganze ist ja schon durchaus etwas länger am kochen.

https://www.tanelorn.net/index.php/topic,124510.0.html

Ich verweise auch mal auf das hier, für die Leute die meinen das es etwas bringen könnte unterschriftenaktionen zu machen,...

https://www.tanelorn.net/index.php/topic,124510.msg135128872.html#msg135128872

 

 

Link to comment

Die nächste Mail ist da, diesesmal von einem KS den ich unterstütze:

Zitat

The warning:

The crux of the issue is that the leaked 1.1 licence attempts to do the following:

· Revoke the previously perpetual 1.0a licence.

· Waive our right to sue Wizards of the Coast (Hasbro).

· Allow our IP to be used by Wizards of the Coasts (Hasbro) for any purpose, forever, without payment or accreditation.

· Allow Wizards of the Coast (Hasbro) to change/terminate the 1.1 licence at any point for any reason with just 30 days’ notice.

· Require us to destroy all of our stock if the licence is terminated.

· Allow Wizards of the Coasts (Hasbro) to continue to sell our products after terminating the licence.

· Disallow the use of any non-static digital files and/or systems. 

If the leaked 1.1 OGL comes into existence in its current form, we can expect the following things to happen:

· Clearly compatible third-party content will no longer be published.

· Tools and distribution channels will be removed for third-parties (like Drivethrurpg).

· Competing products like Pathfinder will no longer be published (these rely on the 1.0a OGL).

· Most virtual tabletops will be taken down.

· D&D-themed patrons, podcasts, and YouTube channels that generate money are vulnerable to being shut down (even those that fall under fair use).

· Kickstarter will remove any roleplaying game campaigns that do not adhere to the new 1.1 licence (they have already confirmed that they are partnering with Wizards of the Coast (Hasbro) on this).

· Wizards of the Coast (Hasbro) will attempt to funnel you into micro-transaction heavy digital systems in an attempt to recreate the worst parts of the current video game industry.

I know that this sounds alarmist and sensational, but please trust that it is not. We have been discussing this with our lawyers – it is a serious threat. 

 

Link to comment

Gerade DAS HIER würde mich abschrecken

Zitat

· Allow Wizards of the Coasts (Hasbro) to continue to sell our products after terminating the licence.

Bedeutet doch: Ich habe Erfolg: WOTC kündigt die Lizenz und macht MEIN Produkt weiter und verkauft was ich erstellt habe einfach weiter und der ehemalige Lizenznehmer bekommt nix mehr

Link to comment
vor 5 Minuten schrieb Octavius Valesius:

Gerade DAS HIER würde mich abschrecken

Bedeutet doch: Ich habe Erfolg: WOTC kündigt die Lizenz und macht MEIN Produkt weiter und verkauft was ich erstellt habe einfach weiter und der ehemalige Lizenznehmer bekommt nix mehr

Ja.

Um mal die Sache von der anderen Seite zu sehen - du hast dein eigenes Regelwerk, deine eigene Welt, dein eigenes Bla ... und verdienst damit kaum etwas weil du einfach nicht die Marktmacht hast.

Stattdessen hängst du dich an ein erfolgreiches Regelwerk dran und machst dazu deine addonregeln deine einen Welt dein eigenes Bla,... und verdienst dir ne goldene Nase.

Ich meine Critical Role und so verdienen Geld mit der Marke D&D ohne das D&D dafür etwas bekommt.

 

aber: nein ich finds trozdem nicht toll und die art und weise ist einfach grottig.

Link to comment
vor 2 Stunden schrieb Detritus:

Nun hat WotC diese OGL verändert

Bisher gibt es nur deren Ankündigung, ein Leak und mehrere sehr aufgeregte Reaktionen, die fast alle auf sehr dünner Belegbasis und sehr viel Annahmen basieren. 

Anmerkung, die Zahl, die als Mindestjahresumsatz kursiert, ab der WotC angeblich (bzw. vermutlich) eine Beteiligung haben möchte, ist relativ hoch. Das heißt, dass es nur eine Handvoll Unternehmen überhaupt betreffen wird. Namentlich wohl vor allem Paizo.

Die OGL wurde von WotC zwar vor allem für deren D&D-Content erstellt, und ohne diese wäre Pathfinder schlicht illegal, aber sie wird auch von anderen Unternehmen für deren IP genutzt, z.B. erlaubt Evil Hat die Nutzung von deren FATE System Toolkit wahlweise über die OGL oder CC-BY.

Das trägt bei einigen zu der Verwirrung bei.

Fakt ist, WotC überarbeitet die OGL. Sie wollen erklärtermaßen an großen Gewinnen beteiligt werden. Sie behaupten, dass die meisten Content-Generatoren nicht betroffen sein werden. Und es gibt einen geleakten Entwurf, bei dem kein Außenstehender wirklich valide sagen kann, welchen Härtegrad der Inhalt hat. 

  • Thanks 5
Link to comment
vor 7 Stunden schrieb Detritus:

Nun hat WotC diese OGL verändert und will doch Lizenzgebühren haben, vor allem von denen, die mit ihrem D&D-Content gut verdienen. Der Hintergrund ist wohl, dass WotC Geldprobleme hat und sich neue Geldquellen erschließen will. Es gibt nämlich einige Contentersteller, die sehr erfolgreich sind, wie z.B. Critical Role, die mit ihren Live-Events bei Twitch und bei der Zweitverwertung auf Youtube sehr viel Geld generieren. Von dem Kuchen will Wizard etwas abhaben.

Nicht nur das. WotC hat letztes Jahr eine sehr profitable Jahr gemacht. 500 mill. Gewinn mit Mrd als gesamte Einnahmen. Die Geschichte was Youtuber und Journalisten die schlauer sind als ich erzählen. Sie sehen Mikro Transaktions von video spiele und das wollen sie auch. Plus ein stück Kuchen von jeder der irgendwie etwas erstellt hat. Laut der neue Vereinbarung alle Veröffentlichung gehören denen und nicht der Autor. 

Link to comment
vor 4 Stunden schrieb Irwisch:

Ich meine Critical Role und so verdienen Geld mit der Marke D&D ohne das D&D dafür etwas bekommt.

Sie nutzen nur die Spielregeln. Der Welt von Mercer und CR kann genauso weiter gespielt werden mit anderen Regeln. Ursprünglich haben sie auch Pathfinder genutzt bis sie live gingen. 

Link to comment
vor 4 Minuten schrieb Mugga:

Sie nutzen nur die Spielregeln. Der Welt von Mercer und CR kann genauso weiter gespielt werden mit anderen Regeln. Ursprünglich haben sie auch Pathfinder genutzt bis sie live gingen. 

Und die OGL gilt vor allem für die Nutzung der Spielregeln. :dunno: und Pathfinder ist ein D&D3.5-Derivat. Also hat CR auch da schon IP von WotC genutzt. Um das zu ermöglichen, hat WotC eben die OGL eingeführt. Damals, als sie die eingeführt haben, sah der Markt noch völlig anders aus.

Grundsätzlich ist es für sie als Rechteinhaber völlig legitim, die Bedingungen, wie andere ihr IP (intelectual Property) nutzen dürfen, den aktuellen Gegebenheiten anzupassen. Auch, dass sie daran verdienen wollen, wenn jemand unter Nutzung ihres Eigentums Geld verdient, ist grundsätzlich legitim.

Genauso wie es legitim ist, dass z.B. Paizo als aktueller finanzieller Hauptnutznießer der aktuellen Gebührenfreiheit diesen Zustand gerne erhalten würde.

Link to comment
vor 3 Stunden schrieb Kazzirah:

Das heißt, dass es nur eine Handvoll Unternehmen überhaupt betreffen wird. Namentlich wohl vor allem Paizo.

Momentan ja, aber es sind schon ein paar mehr als eine handvoll. Plus die Sprache deutet daraufhin das sie jeder Zeit die Grenze ändern kann und man kann nicht darauf klagen. 

Link to comment
vor 11 Minuten schrieb Mugga:

Sie nutzen nur die Spielregeln. Der Welt von Mercer und CR kann genauso weiter gespielt werden mit anderen Regeln. Ursprünglich haben sie auch Pathfinder genutzt bis sie live gingen. 

Das stimmt. Die Welten, die sie bespielen sind eigene und ich habe auch manchmal den Eindruck, dass sie recht frei mit dem Regelwerk hantieren. Dennoch entsteht unter dem Label D&D Content, mit dem sie laut Wiki zwischen August 2019 und Oktober 2021 9,6 Mio. US-$ Umsatz gemacht haben. Das weckt bestimmt Begehrlichkeiten. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
vor 1 Minute schrieb Mugga:

Momentan ja, aber es sind schon ein paar mehr als eine handvoll. Plus die Sprache deutet daraufhin das sie jeder Zeit die Grenze ändern kann und man kann nicht darauf klagen. 

Noch mal, es gibt bisher keine neue offizielle Fassung noch gibt es eine seitens der Rechteinhaberin öffentlich gemachte Diskussionsgrundlage jenseits deren Absichtserklärung. Worauf alle deine Journalisten und YouTuber improvisieren und sich erregen ist eine aus zweifelhafter Quelle stammende angebliche Fassung. Und da wird verdammt viel Bullshit reininterpretiert, was da schlicht nicht drin steht. Ob das mit Absicht, gutem Willen und/oder fehlender Sachkenntnis passiert, wage ich nicht zu beurteilen. 

Das ist doch grad eine sich selbst be- und verstärkende Diskussionsblase ohne wirklich belastbare Quellen.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
vor 14 Stunden schrieb Kazzirah:

Noch mal, es gibt bisher keine neue offizielle Fassung noch gibt es eine seitens der Rechteinhaberin öffentlich gemachte Diskussionsgrundlage jenseits deren Absichtserklärung. Worauf alle deine Journalisten und YouTuber improvisieren und sich erregen ist eine aus zweifelhafter Quelle stammende angebliche Fassung.

Das Dokument existiert. Den kann man vom battlezoo runterladen. Es gibt auch eine Reihe von heavy hitters der Medien Nachrichten Kanälen (CBR.com, ign, gizmodo) die Artikeln und breakdowns bereits veröffentlicht haben. 

Wenn alles so schlimm ist wie es dort geschildert wird, halte ich es für ganz schlimm und kritisch für unseren Hobby. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
vor 30 Minuten schrieb Mugga:

Wenn alles so schlimm ist wie es dort geschildert wird, halte ich es für ganz schlimm und kritisch für unseren Hobby. 

Jede Kriese ist auch eine Chance, auch wenn es von Hasbro nun heist "Vogel friss oder stirb" kann der Vogel immer noch wegfliegen und einfach ... anderes machen.

Es gibt auch andere Systeme die eine mehr oder weniger "offene" OGL haben, RQ, SaWo,... vieleicht macht Pegasus mit M6 auch etwas um die M5 Welt am Laufen zu halten, oder sonstwie das Multiversum zu "befüllen" (nur um mal etwas gesponnen zu haben wie es aussschauen könnte).

Link to comment
vor 29 Minuten schrieb Irwisch:

Es gibt auch andere Systeme die eine mehr oder weniger "offene" OGL haben, RQ, SaWo,... vieleicht macht Pegasus mit M6 auch etwas um die M5 Welt am Laufen zu halten, oder sonstwie das Multiversum zu "befüllen"

 

vor 25 Minuten schrieb Octavius Valesius:

Wecke keine Träume bei mir.

Ich habe auch bewusst Pegasus hier verlinkt. 😉

  • Haha 1
Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...